Adults with good or very good overall health

Source: NHS Digital

Base: Adults aged 16 and over

Between 1993 and 2016, the proportion of adults reporting very good and good general health has been very similar.

Note: General health is self-assessed with the question: How is your health in general. Would you say it was very good, good, fair, bad, or very bad? 

Year-on-year fluctuations may not indicate real changes and can be within the margins of sampling error. We comment only on the changes that are more likely to reflect a real change.


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Adults with one or more longstanding illnesses

Source: NHS Digital

Base: Adults aged 16 and over

The proportion of adults reporting one or more longstanding illnesses increased from 40% in 1993 to a peak of 46% in 2001, but has since fallen to 41% in 2016.

Note: Since 2012, participants have been asked: Do you have any physical or mental health conditions or illnesses lasting or expected to last 12 months or more? Before 2012, the questions on longstanding illness were slightly different but were changed to be consistent with the harmonised disability questions designed for use in social surveys. 

Year-on-year fluctuations may not indicate real changes and can be within the margins of sampling error. We comment only on the changes that are more likely to reflect a real change.


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Adults with acute sickness

Source: NHS Digital

Base: Adults aged 16 and over

Note: Acute sickness is self-assessed in the HSE. It is defined as any illness or injury (including any longstanding condition) that causes the participant to cut down on usual activities in the last two weeks. 

Year-on-year fluctuations may not indicate real changes and can be within the margins of sampling error. We comment only on the changes that are more likely to reflect a real change.

 


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Adults with acute sickness: comparison by income in 2009

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Adults with acute sickness: comparison by income in 2009

Adults in lower income households were more likely to report acute sickness than higher income households. In 2009, 22% of those in the lowest income quintile reported acute sickness compared to 12% in the highest income quintile.

Note: Acute sickness is self-assessed in the HSE. It is defined as any illness or injury (including any longstanding condition) that causes the participant to cut down on usual activities in the last two weeks. We use equivalised household income, which is a measure of income that takes into account the number of persons in the household. More detail of how this is derived is provided in the Glossary, Appendix B of the report Health Survey for England 2016: Methods. 


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Further information